You are currently browsing the category archive for the ‘plotting’ category.

torn between two lovers...

torn between two lovers...

Those of you who have been reading the Lakeshore Chronicles have met Daisy in every book, but her whole story hasn’t been told…until tomorrow, the official pub date of MARRYING DAISY BELLAMY. It’s a very cool story, if I do say so myself.

In Lakeshore Christmas (2009), her story progresses, but again it’s only a secondary plot, so we don’t get to dig too deep.

Daisy’s juggling single motherhood, school and career. And because this is a Wiggs book, she is looking for love. Her dilemma? Does she want to find it with Logan, the father of her child? Or with Julian, the sexy adrenalin junkie who first captivated her when they were in high school?

MY dilemma in Lakeshore Christmas was how far to take the storyline. I can’t reveal who she chooses, but I needed to play fair with the reader. It was tricky. What do you think? Should she choose Logan? Julian? Or what about Zach, the steadfast best friend? Or someone brand new and unexpected?

Well, Daisy made her choice, but it wasn’t easy. Early reviews are good, bless you reviewers, and most of them non-spoilerish.

Deborah Bouziden: How do you plot? Use an outline? What are your most common plot problems and how do you handle them? Have you ever had a plot disaster or crisis? How did you handle it? Do you advise outlining? Why or why not?

work-in-progress

work-in-progress

SW: I plot the way I put together characters, cobbling together shiny bits and pieces that interest me, and assembling them into a story arc. I have the common problem of not thinking things through to their logical conclusion until it’s too late to change. I have a plot disaster or crisis in every effing book! I handle it by swearing!

Outlining can be useful at any stage. It doesn’t need to be elaborate. Just list scenes and incidents and let one step grow out of the previous one. People who don’t outline or put together a synopsis should reconsider. It’s an opportunity to brainstorm and add layers and events.

DB: What advice can you give writers about first drafts?

SW: Write from your heart, every day. Don’t worry about revisions until you have a good chunk to work on. Be fearless.

Real quick–I’m posting a free online writing workshop entitled “Plotting From the Inside Out.” In other words, how to write your way into the heart of your story. Come join in the fun!

Join me on Facebook. You won’t be sorry.

I tend to spontaneously give stuff away to readers and libraries. Join the fun here. Really.

Top Clicks

take a look at a book

Buy or borrow my books at WorldCat.org.

Search for an item in libraries near you:
Enter title, subject or author
WorldCat.org >>

Blog Stats

  • 813,465 hits

Pages

June 2020
S M T W T F S
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930