So I’m breaking in a new friend–a KitchenAid stand mixer. There wasn’t really anything wrong with the previous Hamilton Beach–but the thing was ancient and tended to fling batter 360 degrees around the kitchen, so I got this new one.

ANZAC biscuits 002

new toy

The inaugural recipe is for some delicious, chewy cookies from Down Under. ANZAC stands for Australia-New Zealand-Air Corps. “Biscuits” stands for cookies. And you thought you wouldn’t learn anything from this blog. I’ve Americanized the ingredients so you don’t get confused by metric measures and things like “bicarbonate of soda” (aka baking soda). These are totally simple, first invented during WWII by housewives who needed a recipe without eggs for cookies that would keep for a long time.

They only call for one weird ingredient you probably don’t have on hand–Golden Syrup. I love that they call it that, like it’s something from Harry Potter. This recipe is simple to double, which you might want to do if you live with a cookie monster.

ANZAC biscuits

any oats will do

ANZAC biscuits

Lyle's Golden Syrup, the secret ingredient

Ingredients

  • 1  cup  rolled oats (regular or quick cooking, or combine with oat bran and/or ground flax seed for extra nutrition)
  • 1  cup  all-purpose flour
  • 1  cup  packed brown sugar
  • 1/2  cup  shredded sweetened coconut
  • 1/2  teaspoon  baking soda
  • 4 T butter, softened (use margarine if you must, or if your son-in-law is lactose intolerant)
  • 3  tablespoons  water
  • 2  tablespoons  golden syrup (I think in the South they call it cane syrup
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • optional additions: cinnamon,  almond extract, raisins (they call them Sultanas Down Undah), nuts, chocolate bits…
  • Parchment paper and cooking spray
ANZAC biscui

high performance stirring

Combine dry ingredients, then stir in water, butter and syrup; stir well. Add extra things to taste. Drop by level tablespoons, 2 inches apart, onto baking sheets covered with parchment paper and sprayed with cooking spray. Do not try these without parchment paper. Parchment paper is your friend. Bake at 325° for 12 minutes or until almost set. parchment paper is your friendRemove from oven; let stand 2 to 3 minutes or until firm. Remove cookies from baking sheets. Place on wire racks; let cool completely.If you’re an inquisitive dobie, you definitely want to check out the action. This is a technique Barkis calls counter-surfing.

bake for 10-15 minutes, just keep an eye on themnow you'll wish you'd doubled the recipe